Pulse

Pulses are part of the legume family, but the term “pulse” refers only to the dried seed. Dried peas, edible beans, lentils and chickpeas are the most common varieties of pulses. Pulses are very high in protein and fibre, and are low in fat. Like their cousins in the legume family, pulses are nitrogen-fixing crops that improve the environmental sustainability of annual cropping systems.

Pulses are a great tasting addition to any diet. They are rich in fibre and protein, and have high levels of minerals such as iron, zinc, and phosphorous as well as folate and other B-vitamins. In addition to their nutritional profile and links to improved health, pulses are unique foods in their ability to reduce the environmental footprint of our grocery carts. Put it all together and these sensational seeds are a powerful food ingredient that can be used to deliver the results of healthy people and a healthy planet.

Pulses come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours and can be consumed in many forms including whole or split, ground in to flours or separated into fractions such as protein, fibre and starch. 

Pulses do not include fresh beans or peas. Although they are related to pulses because they are also edible seeds of podded plants, soybeans and peanuts differ because they have a much higher fat content, whereas pulses contain virtually no fat.

Pulse Types

The lentil (Lens culinaris) is an edible pulse.

Glycine max, commonly known as soybean in North America or soya bean,

Chickpea is the most important pulse crop in Ethiopia. The bulk of the crop variety in the country is dominated by the sweet Desi type, and the Kabuli type is also grown in limited areas.

Haricot bean is one of the most important legumes grown in the lowlands of Ethiopia, particularly in the Rift Valley. In these area farmers grow white pea beans for export and home consumption.